Mark C. Crowley

Transformative Leadership for the 21st Century

If you're focusing on EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT
you're aiming WAY TOO LOW!
“Shift your focus to what really matters to your organization:
employee commitment, initiative, and sustainable high performance.”
– Mark C. Crowley
MARK C. CROWLEY
Navigation Menu

Three Stunning Leadership Trends That Should Give Hope To Workers Everywhere

Posted by on Dec 9, 2013 in Current Affairs, Heart Leadership In Practice, Leadership, Life Lessons, Wisdom From Other Authors | 1 comment

Heart & Mind“The future ain’t what it used to be.”

 – Yogi Berra

Directly or indirectly, the common theme expressed in everything I write is that our traditional ways of leading people in the workplace are failing.

We’ve seen employee engagement fall precipitously over a generation, and now have irrefutable evidence that it cannot and will not recover until we collectively adopt leadership practices that intentionally support the higher needs of workers – human beings.

My goal for each new article has been to further explain why leadership must change, and how some enlightened organizations and visionaries already are contributing to the creation of an entirely new, and far more effective model.

As we approach the New Year, I see it filled with promise.  It’s clear that our collective view on how best to inspire employee performance is fundamentally and irrevocably shifting.  What’s stunning to me is that it’s happening so fast.

To give you a new glimpse into the future of leadership, I want to share three profound trends that are building wave-like momentum in business.  A major transformation is underway and it’s largely being influenced by some noteworthy reversals in our thinking.

Read More

The Single Greatest Reason The World’s Workforce Is Disengaged

Posted by on Oct 14, 2013 in Current Affairs, Heart Leadership In Practice, Leadership, Wisdom From Other Authors | 0 comments

Gallup Poll“No problem can be solved until it is reduced to some simple form. The changing of a vague difficulty into a specific, concrete form is a very essential element in thinking.”

–J. P. Morgan

 

In the early part of this past summer, Gallup released its “State of the American Workforce” report – a massive research undertaking that identified how connected and contented people feel in their jobs.  It’s from this study, 150,000 personal interviews over the course of a year, that researchers determined only 30% of us are fully engaged at work.

The news got even worse a few days ago when Gallup announced the results of its global workplace study.  Across 142 countries, they discovered only 13% of the working population does much more than show up on time and meet the minimum expectations for their jobs.

Take a look at these worldwide results:

  • 13% Engaged: Employees feel a strong connection to the success of their organization – almost as owners – and invest significant discretionary time and effort. 
  • 63% Not Engaged: People feel less connected to their work and are disinclined to display initiative.
  • 24% Actively Disengaged: Workers who are unhappy, unproductive – and liable to spread their negativity to co-workers.
  • This means 87% of the world’s working population is not meaningfully engaged in, or otherwise enthusiastic about their jobs.
  • Worldwide, actively disengaged employees outnumber engaged employees by nearly 2:1.

Soon after the U.S. engagement report was released, I interviewed Dr. Jim Harter, Gallup’s Chief Research Scientist, and wrote a subsequent article for Fast Company Magazine.  Leveraging much of Gallup’s research, I listed the key reasons American workers have grown so distressed in their jobs, and described the most effective ways managers can address them.

But now, four months later, I’m left to wonder how the world’s economy succeeds by having just 13% of the working population fully committed to excellence? Clearly, we manage, but is this really the best our global society can do?

With the hope that Gallup’s new research might shed new light on this engagement crisis, I reached out to Dr. Harter again.  To frame up our conversation, I asked him just two questions:

(1)  Is there one universal root to why people across the world are so disheartened in their jobs?

(2)  As a society, can we fix this so that people can instead thrive at work, maximize their own potential, and help drive greater performance for their organizations?

Read More

A Balance Between Masculine And Feminine Traits: The Requirements For Success As A 21st Century Leader

Posted by on Jun 30, 2013 in Heart Leadership In Practice, Leadership, Wisdom From Other Authors |


The Athena Doctrine“I think we need the feminine qualities of leadership, which include attention to aesthetics and the environment, nurturing, affection, intuition and the qualities that make people feel safe and cared for.”                      

 – Deepak Chopra


Just before my book, Lead From The Heart, was published, a public relations executive told me directly: “Your book is terrific, but no one in business is going to take it seriously unless you change the title.”

In the context of workplace leadership, it’s the word, “heart” that instinctively strikes many people as being soft, sentimental and weak.  From my PR friend’s perspective, managing with any degree of care or advocacy simply isn’t regarded as being manly.  And, since men largely dominate leadership positions, he urged me to rename the book.

I chose to go forward with the title, of course, full knowing I’d face some initial resistance.  And ever since, I’ve made it my intention to find as much compelling evidence as possible to prove the solution to the world’s employee engagement crisis lies in leadership practices that positively affect the hearts in people.  This is all I write about.

So I begin this blog by expressing my profound appreciation to Pulitzer Prize winning journalist, Michael D’Antonio, and his best selling co-author, John Gerzema.   Their new book, The Athena Doctrine: How Women, And The Men Who Think Like Them, Will Rule The Future, offers remarkable insight into what it takes to excel as a leader in the 21st Century.  And, just as Deepak Chopra insightfully suggests in his quote above, their conclusion is that effective leadership today requires a greater balance between male and female traits and values – equilibrium of mind and heart.

Gerzema and D’Antonio initiated a survey of 64,000 people – all chosen to mirror the populations in 13 countries (e.g. the US, Mexico, South Korea, Germany and the UK) that represent 65% of the world’s domestic product.  As experienced researchers, the authors intentionally sought a wide range of cultural, geographical, political, religious and economic diversity.

To summarize what they discovered: The skills required to thrive in today’s world – such as honesty, empathy, communication, appreciation and collaboration – are widely regarded as being on the feminine side of human nature. Consequently, we’ve reached the end of the hyper-masculine era in leadership as these and many other feminine qualities have become more highly valued.

Here’s a summary of their findings:  

Read More

The Profound Lesson Plants Teach Us About Leading People

Posted by on May 16, 2013 in Wisdom From Other Authors |

PlantingTreesI’ve come to trust that books show up in my life for a reason.

I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve been in a bookstore when some internal radar system seemed to guide me down the aisles until a knowing voice insisted that I “buy that one.”   The great mystery of this process is that the books I’ve ended up with have always proved to be transformational in some way.

But a few weeks ago, I thought my inner guidance had gone on the fritz.  I was staring at a book called, “What A Plant Knows: A Field Guide To The Senses” and thought for certain it couldn’t be meant for me.

But the “voice” had a way of persuading me that it was.  It seemed to be fully aware that I was no botanist, had taken “Biology For Non-majors” in college, and specifically came into Barnes and Noble to find something leadership related.

Yet just as all other times in the past, I quickly discovered I’d ended up with the right book at the right time.  And long before I’d read the final pages, it became quite clear that a profound lesson on leadership was indeed embedded in its pages.

Here’s a summary of what I learned.

Read More

Uniting Spirituality And Leadership For The Sake Of Employee Engagement

Posted by on Apr 4, 2013 in Heart Leadership In Practice, Leadership, Wisdom From Other Authors |

The Human HeartThe word spiritual, not the word religious, is the key.”

                                                      Clarence Clemons

One of my son’s closest friends started following me on Twitter recently, and after reading my tweets for a couple of weeks, sent along an e-mail summarizing his initial observations:

“Your dad is like a Twitter God.  He’s practically a leadership religious leader or something!

Admittedly, when I read the e-mail myself, I thought it was pretty cool that anyone would perceive me as being a “Twitter God!”  But it was the “religious leader” part of the comment that held my attention the longest.  Honestly, I’ve never sought to be seen as a “religious” leader, nor do I have any of the requisite background that would qualify me to be one.

Anyone familiar with my work knows that I’m a recent author, but that I also spent two-plus decades as a senior-level executive in the financial services industry.  I’m a business leader, people!  “How is it possible that anyone could think otherwise?”

Well, it turns out I may be sending mixed messages.  Tweets I send routinely use words like “compassion,” “kindness” and “empathy.”  My book is even called “Lead From The Heart!  I have to admit, to a first time tweet reader, I probably sound more like the Dalai Lama than any well-known Fortune 500 CEO.

But I’m not going soft with these tweets, I can assure you.  What I’ve discovered is that many words traditionally heard in a spiritual context are characteristics of the most successful and influential business leaders today.  You simply can no longer be effective in motivating human beings in any workplace if you lack qualities like thoughtfulness, generosity and sincerity.

We know today that a huge percentage of the American workforce is distressed beyond imagination about their jobs, bosses and organizations.  Revealing just how badly people are being managed and led, one new study showed that at 42% of US companies, the best employees are the least engaged.  This means that in 4 of every 10 organizations, leaders have essentially lost the support of every worker.

A big part of the reason so many people have grown so disconsolate in their jobs, is because they too often feel undervalued and unappreciated.  “No one cares about me or what I contribute here,” summarizes much of distress.  What I know to be true is that the human need to feel significant, and to know one’s work matters, are both deeply spiritual.  And the wisest leaders in business today not only know this, they demonstrate through their presence that people are unequivocally essential to the success of their organization.

My main thesis is that feelings and emotions drive human performance and, therefore, leaders who make people feel – in their core – that their organization would be fully deficient were they not there, will be the big winners in the 21st Century.

Here are three “spiritual” ways you as a leader can ensure employees feel this highly valued:

Read More